Modern meets Old Fashioned…

Old Fashioned Pastrami Sandwich from Modern Day Forager

Modern’s Old Fashioned Pastrami on Rye

Paying tribute to an old fashioned deli masterpiece.  One of the simplest, most familiar, sandwiches is pastrami on rye, and for many, it is the king of all sandwiches.

Foolproof, this  rich silky, garlicky, peppery and piled sky-high pastrami needs no bells or whistles.  The magic happens, when crafting the meat– curing, spicing, crusting, smoking and steaming.  Then, all that is needed is soft chewy seeded rye, one that has some sourness to it, along with a dusting of cornmeal on the bread’s surface.  The bread must be warm (a must) and is the perfect vehicle to add a heaping helping of Modern’s Stout Mustard, which never disappoints.  So curate high-quality meat or make your own.  This iconic sandwich is as straight-forward as it gets, but provides a taste that you remember and want over and over, keeping  you coming back for more.

I could not blog about pastrami without mentioning my favorite place in the world to have this sandwich, and it is not even in NYC.  For me, Langer’s in LA, downtown LA no less, is  truly the very best.  It is a pastrami mecca, and the pastrami sandwich is taken very seriously at this landmark restaurant.  So, if you are ever in Los Angles, this is a must-have sandwich.

Langer’s Deli

704 S. Alvarado Street

Los Angles ,90057

+ 213.483.8050  langersdeli.com

Old Fashioned Pastrami with Stout Mustard by Modern Day Forager

Modern’s Old Fashion Pastrami on Rye

Ingredients:
  • 12 ounces thick cut pastrami  (Purchased from your local deli or make your own, recipes below)
  • 4 slices of rye bread
  • 2 tablespoons MDF Stout Mustard
  1. Place pastrami in a skillet over medium high heat.  Cook until fat of pastrami starts to steam, cover with two slices of rye bread.  Steam bread to warm, remove bread, flip over pastrami.   Cover with remaining rye bread and steam.
  2. On your work surface, place 2 slices of steamed rye bread and spread each with 1 tablespoon MDF Stout Mustard.  Layer each bread slice with 6 oz. thick cut pastrami; place two remaining slices of bread on top of pastrami.
  3. Enjoy! 

Variations:

  • Layer pastrami, sautéed onions and Thousand Island dressing on rye bread.
  • Top with house made cole slaw
  • Swiss Cheese
  • Horseradish sauce
  • Slice Pastrami thin and pile high

Home-Cured Beef Pastrami by Michael Ruhlman on Ruhlman.com

Ingredients:

  • 6 ounces or 3/4 cups kosher salt
  • 3 ounces or ½ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons pink salt, optional
  • 5 cloves garlic, smashed with the flat side of a knife
  • 4 tablespoons pickling spice
  • 1 5-pound beef brisket, the more fat it has the better

Rub:

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon peppercorn, toasted and ground (or as needed)
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seed, toasted and ground (or as needed)

Directions:

  1. In pot large enough to hold brisket, combine 1 gallon/4 liters of water with kosher salt, sugar, sodium nitrite (if using), garlic and 2 tablespoons pickling spice.  Bring to a simmer, stirring until salt and sugar are dissolved. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until chilled.
  2. Place brisket in brine, weighted with a plate to keep it submerged; cover.  Refrigerate for 2 days if it’s thin, a third day if it’s thick.
  3. Remove brisket from brine and rinse thoroughly.  Refrigerate it for another day uncovered (this is best, to let cure equalize, but if you can’t wait, that’s ok too).
  4. Combine the pepper and coriander and coat the brisket with it.   Smoke and cook the brisket, till tender, as described above.  Slice thinly to serve.  This will keep for a week in the refrigerated.  Steam it to reheat or reheat covered in a microwave (gently).

Pickling Spice

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 2 tablespoons hot red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons allspice berries
  • 1 tablespoon ground mace
  • 2 small cinnamon sticks, crushed or broken into pieces
  • 2 to 4 bay leaves, crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger

Directions:

  1. Combine peppercorns, mustard seeds and coriander seeds in a small dry pan.  Place over medium heat and stir until fragrant, being careful not to burn them; keep lid handy in case seeds pop.  Crack peppercorns and seeds in mortar and pestle or with the side of a knife on cutting board.
  2. Combine with other spices, mix.  Store in tightly sealed plastic or glass container.

Pastrami Recipe for use with Smoker and Cherry Wood

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup black peppercorns
  • 4 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 5 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 to 6 pound brisket flat, trimmed
  • 1 qt beef stock
  • 2 12 ounce bottles of beer
  • 3/4  gallon cold water
  • 4 tablespoons pickling spices
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons additional juniper berries
  • 2 tablespoons additional black peppercorns

Directions:

  1. Place peppercorns and coriander seeds in a grinder and grind until coarsely chopped.  Mix the salt, sugar, garlic, and ginger with the seasonings from the grinder.
  2. Reserve 1/4 of the seasonings.  Rub the flat thoroughly on all sides with seasonings.  Wrap in plastic wrap, then aluminum foil.  Place in a glass pan in the refrigerator.  Turn daily for at least one week, up to two weeks is better. Remove brisket from all wrappings.  Place on rack in pan so it can drain, and put uncovered in refrigerator  overnight, until very dry.
  3.  Prepare smoker with cherry wood at lowest temperature while still producing smoke.   Place cold flat in the smoker. Smoke for 3 hours,
  4. Remove  from smoker and place in a large dutch oven.  Cover  with  beef stock, beer and water.  Add the reserved rub, the pickling spice, the bay leaves, the additional juniper berries, and the additional black peppercorns.
  5. Simmer covered until tender about 3 hours.
  6. Remove from pot and slice. (cut across grain)
Recipes by Rj of Urban Table
Photo Styling & Art Direction by Traci of Urban Table
Photography & Art Direction by Heather of Heather Gill Photography

 

Modern Day Forager

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Modern’s take on Mustarda and Chimichurri

Spicy Mustarda by Modern Day Forager

This cherished (Sicilian) Italian condiment has many faces, made with fruit, (fresh, dried or candied) sugary syrup, wine and the essence of mustard, it is quite versatile.  The specialty dish, Bollito Mistro in northern Italy, traditionally served mustarda along side this hearty stew (similar to the French Pot-au-feu) as a celebration dish in the fall and winter.  It has gained popularity and made its way as an accompaniment on charcuterie, crusty breads, cheese boards, spooned over creamy polenta and it is equally delicious, crowned on poultry, game and fish.  It even adds a depth of savory piquancy and sweet flavor as a quick pan sauce or poured over ice cream.  Our favorite way to enjoy mostarda is to add it to a grilled salami and gruyere cheese sandwich, the mostarda just adds a richness and a spicy-sugary balance to the saltiness of the cheese and salami.  Yum!

 Spicy Mostarda

Ingredients:

• 1/2 cup dried apricots
• 1/2 cup dried cranberries
• 1/2 cup dried figs
• 1/2 cup dried cherries
• 1 shallot, minced
• 1 1/2 teaspoons minced crystallized ginger
• 1 cup dry white wine
• 1/4 cup honey
• 2  firm Bartlett pears, cubed
• 2 tablespoons of yellow mustard seeds
• 1 tablespoon mustard powder
• 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions:

1.  Place the dried fruits, shallot, ginger, wine and honey in a medium saucepan and simmer for 10 minutes.
2.  Add pears, mustard seed and mustard powder and continue simmering for another 10 minutes.  (pears should soften but still hold shape)
3.  Season with red pepper flake, salt and freshly ground black pepper.
4.  We like our mustarda chunky here at MDF but if you prefer a thinner consistency you can puree part half the mixture and then mix for a medium chunk or puree the entire batch for a jam like consistency.
5.  Let the mustarda cool, place in a sealed container and store in the refrigerator.

Chimichurri Sauce by Modern Day Forager

This acclaimed quintessential Argentinean sauce, chimichurri compliments grilled meats perfectly and is a crowd pleaser you should try for your next summertime gathering.  This fairly spicy sauce is bright, fresh and herbaceous with a garlicky, tangy punch.  Made of parsley, oregano,  garlic, shallots, vinegar, fresh lemon juice, red pepper flakes, and olive oil, this sauce really needs time to meld all of the flavors together, so make a day or two ahead of time, before you serve it.  Not only can you present this table side but if you don’t have the extra time to make it ahead, it also makes a easy and quick (that day) marinade for vegetable kabobs, beef, lamb, poultry,  fish and will really pop and heighten the flavor.

 Argentinian Chimichurri Sauce

Ingredients:

• 1 cup chopped Italian parsley
• 5 cloves garlic, chopped
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
• 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
• 2 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves
• 1 shallot
• 3/4 cup olive oil
• 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
• 3 tablespoons lemon juice

Directions:

1.  Place all chimichurri sauce ingredients in a blender or food processor and pulse until well chopped, but not pureed.
2.   Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Plus it makes an incredible cheeseburger topping.  Try adding it to soups, stews and rice dishes, as well.

Recipes by Rj of Urban Table
Photo Styling & Art Direction by Traci of Urban Table
Photography & Art Direction by Heather of Heather Gill Photography

MODERN DAY FORAGER

An ode to ketchup and mustard…

We all know that ketchup and mustard are the king and queen reigning the condiment world, while we know there is something nostalgic about commercial brands, don’t leave it in the hands of Heinz and French’s.  Embrace making your own handcrafted customized concoctions.
Ketchup by Modern Day Forager


Making ketchup is really quiet simple, and the flavor combinations are endless.  So why not?  If you have an abundance of tomatoes from your garden this summer, why not use these juicy orbs of goodness and build a better ketchup?

MDF FARM FRESH KETCHUP

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup Olive oil
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1/2 small bulb fennel, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 pounds fresh tomatoes (experiment with your favorites)
  • 1 1/2 cups filtered water
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar (3/4 cup if you don’t want ketchup tangy)
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar

Directions:

  1. Place the first 12 ingredients in a large pot over a medium-low heat for 15 minutes stirring often.
  2. Add the tomatoes and 1 1/2 cups of water.  Turn heat to medium-high stirring often, until liquid is reduced by half.
  3. Pour mixture into a food processor and process until smooth, then pour mixture through a mesh sieve into a clean pot.
  4. Over medium heat stir in red wine vinegar and brown sugar, and reduce to the thickness you desire.
  5. Cool and then store in refrigerator.

If you prefer a chunky style, just omit the sieve step.

Stout Mustard by Modern Day Forager

Don’t hold the mustard or cut the mustard, make mustard!  This top dog condiment is surprisingly a cinch to make.  However, there are a few basics you need to understand about the process for making really good quality mustard.  First, the seeds need a good crushing and grind, and the key here is to add cold liquid (cold stout in this recipe) to add moisture to the mustard seeds.  Mustard gets its bite when the cracked seeds release volatile oils, much like capsaicin, the “hot” in chile peppers and when mixed with the liquid, the result is pungent and spicy.

Second, heat will temper the chemical reaction (much like cutting a onion) so, hot mustard, cold liquid, warmer liquid a more mellow mustard.  Also, in addition of the cold liquid remember that adding an acid is crucial to the recipe.  If you don’t add the acid, the mustard will lose its bite over time.  Adding vinegar, for instance, will stop and set the chemical reaction in place.

Mustard is extremely versatile, with many variations, it livens up and pairs well with sandwiches, cold meats, cheese, greens, burgers and hotdogs.  Rj and I are from Chicago and the only way to eat a dog is with mustard, sorry ketchup.  It also is a great emulsifying agent/stablizer for salad dressings, marinades, dips, sauces and spreads.  By making your own, you avoid all the goop of artificial flavors, fillers, colors and homemade just tastes better. 

MDF Extra Stout Mustard

 Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons brown mustard seeds, crushed
  • 1/3 cup Cold Guinness Extra Stout
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 small clove garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large mason jar, cover and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour the ingredients into a food processor or blender and process until the seeds are broken down and you reach your desired consistency, it will thicken the more you process. (You may also use an immersion blender right in jar)
  3. Store in your refrigerator, for up to 2 weeks.
Recipes by Rj of Urban Table
Photo Styling & Art Direction by Traci of Urban Table
Photography & Art Direction by Heather of Heather Gill Photography
Modern Day Forager

Open Faced Grilled Cheese with Creamy Tomato Soup

Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup by Modern Day Forager

Recipes by Rj of Urban Table
Photo Style & Art Direction by Traci of Urban Table

Photography & Art Direction by Heather of Heather Gill Photography

Tomato Soup by Modern Day Forager

One of my most cherished memories of eating an open faced grilled cheese sandwich,  a steamy bowl of creamy tomato soup and a cold glass of milk, is when I was a little girl and my GG , would lovingly prepare me this meal for me whenever I was sick, stayed home from school, or needed some extra TLC.  There is just nothing better than having your Grandma take care of you and her making your favorite comfort foods.  I could always count on her to do that for me and make me feel special.   As a I grew older, the tables had turned , and I was the one lovingly preparing this recipe for my GG to comfort her when she was ill.  I will always be very grateful for the time I got to spend with her.

Ingredients:

For the creamy tomato soup:

  •             4 lbs. ripe heirloom tomatoes
  •             2 T olive oil
  •             1 T unsalted butter
  •             2 stalks celery, finely chopped
  •             1/3 cup shallots, finely chopped
  •             1/2 cup chicken stock, or as needed
  •             1 t fresh basil, chiffonade, extra for garnish
  •             1/2 t sugar
  •             1/2 cup heavy cream
  •              salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup by Modern Day Forager

For the grilled cheese: 

  • 3/4 lb. mild cheddar cheese, thinly sliced
  • 6 slices whole grain bread
  • 1/2 pound cream cheese, softened
  • 4 Tbs. unsalted butter, at room temperature

Directions:  To make the soup, preheat an oven to 400°F.  Lightly oil a rimmed baking sheet. Cut the tomatoes in half lengthwise and place them, cut side up, on the prepared baking sheet and brush with olive oil.  Roast until the tomatoes look somewhat shriveled, about 45-50 minutes.  Let cool for about 20 minutes.  Transfer the tomatoes and any juices to a food processor, pulse until chopped, then put the tomatoes and their juices through a food mill placed over a bowl.  You should have about 3 1/2 cups tomato purée.  Discard the contents and tomatoes skins from the food mill.
 
In a large saucepan, melt the butter over medium-low heat.  Add the celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 5 minutes.  Add the shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 3 minutes.
 
Stir in the tomato purée, 1/2 cup stock, and the basil and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat.  Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, for about 15 minutes.  Stir in the sugar. In 3 or 4 batches, transfer the soup to a blender and process until smooth.  Transfer to a clean saucepan; add the cream and heat until piping hot but not boiling.  If the soup seems too thick, thin with more stock.  Season to taste with salt, pepper and garnish with fresh basil leaves and serve warm.  To make the open face grilled cheese sandwiches; heat a griddle or 2 large frying pans over medium heat until hot.  For each sandwich, place one-fourth of the cheese on top of bread slice and top cream cheese, then layer with fresh tomatoes, season with salt, pepper and garnish with extra basil.  Place on the griddle, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until the undersides are golden brown, 3–4 minutes.  Ladle the soup into warmed bowls.  Serve and enjoy!!!
Grilled Cheese and Tomato Soup by Modern Day Forager

Modern Day Forager

Wrap Up for Tomato Week

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Make your own Bloody Mary Mix

Just in case you missed anything this week, here is a wrap up of the week for you.  We sure enjoyed bringing you a start to summer with all of our tomato recipes.  Summer means so many different things to each of us.  For Heather its all about the bounty of what the season’s gardens have to offer.  She remembers all the time spent at her grandparents, picking vegetables from their garden.  Tomatoes were always a favorite treat.  There is nothing better then the smell and taste of a fresh picked tomato.

Traci and Rj spent summers in the Midwest and have wonderful memories of homemade ice cream and great times by the lake.  Grandmothers gardens and all the wonder that it has to bring.

We thank you once again for joining us.  We loved bringing you the start to summer for us.  Have a wonderful weekend.  Please stop our Facebook page and share with us some of your favorite eats and treats from your weekend.

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Tomato Lardon Jam

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Golden & Red Cherry Tomato Vinaigrette

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Fried Green Tomatoes and Classic Remoulade Sauce

Modern Day Forager

FOUND for Tomato Week

Tomato week has been such a blast and has conjured up so many summertime memories for our crew.

We have  found some great items to go with your garden’s bounty.

How about doing pizza on the grill?  We love this pizza stone, it has a heavy stainless steal frame and makes the pie easier to transfer. So what are the benefits of a pizza stone?  It helps the dough cook more evenly and draws out the moisture which results in a crisper crust.  A great tool for your indoor or outdoor kitchen.

$59.95

pizza stone with frame pizza stone on grill

Williams-Sonoma

Good quality flour should be a staple in every well equipped pantry, we love the products from Hayden Flour Mills and their  pizza flour is a special treat .  Local heritage grains stone milled here in sunny Arizona, made from hard white wheat and white sonora wheat.

$8.00

pizza_flour_large

Native Seeds for Hayden Flour Mill

We have given you a plethora of tomato recipes but thought  you just might want a few more to add to your literary collection.  This book from Chronicle Books is not just pretty to look at it is also packed with some quick recipes.  We are thrilled to have this in our cookbook library.

$16.95

The_Heirloom_Tomato_Cookbook

Chronicle Books

You might like to try your hand at growing tomatoes in your own backyard patch and heirlooms are the way to go.  The flavor and colors of these little gems will look delicious on your pizza.  There are so many to choose from, we found some good ones to get you started on Etsy.

$3.75 and up

heirloom tomato seeds

Cubit’s – Ethical Seeds for Edible Gardens

We can’t leave out another local favorite for us, Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar from Queen Creek Olive Mill.  Hand crafted and high quality flavored olive oils and vinegars, made from the only working olive mill in our state.  Great for baking as well as drizzling over fresh produce, dips and marinades.  The Balsamic Vinegar is a winning combination drizzled with a couple grinds of black pepper.

Starting at $11.00

stawberry_balsamic_vinegar extra-virgin-olive-oil

Queen Creek Olive Mill

Modern Day Forager

Golden and Red Cherry Tomato Vinaigrette

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Recipes by: Rj of Urban Table

Photo Styling & Art Direction by: Traci of Urban Table

Photography & Art Direction by: Heather of Heather Gill Photography

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Incredibly versatile and refreshing, this zesty dressing is very satisfying.   Try tossing into a pasta, add as a topper for a tasty cheese tartin or on a piece of fresh salmon for a quick and easy weeknight supper.

Golden  and  Red Cherry Tomato Vinaigrette

1 minced shallot

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 pint halved golden and red cherry tomatoes

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar (we prefer Zinfandel)

2 tablespoons freshly grated horseradish

salt and pepper to taste

2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

Directions:

  1. Sweat shallots in olive oil over medium heat for about 5 minutes.
  2. Add tomato halves stirring and crushing for another 5 minutes.
  3. Add red wine vinegar, extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper.
  4. Refrigerate before serving to let flavors come together.
  5. Bring vinaigrette to room temperature and topped with  fresh chives before serving.

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Modern Day Forager

Tomato Lardon Jam

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Recipes by: Rj of Urban Table

Photo Styling & Art Direction by: Traci of Urban Table

Photography & Art Direction by: Heather of Heather Gill Photography

tomatojam

This tomato jam pulls triple duty over and over (and over). Spicy, savory, and oh so jammy and if that wasn’t enough we have added lardons. ( a small strip or cube of pork fat) It also can be used as a dip, condiment, or spread and that is just scratching the surface. Try this new staple on burgers, as an addition to a cheese board or to elevate your next grilled cheese.

Tomato Lardon Jam

4 slices thick-cut (as thick as you can find) slices of smoked bacon (we like applewood) very cold or frozen

1 cup diced shallots

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

2 1/2 cups Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced

1/4 teaspoon African Bird Pepper

salt & pepper

Directions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees
  2. Cut bacon into 1/4 inch cubes
  3. Line an edged baking sheet pan and roast bacon cubes until they have crisp outsides.  Remove to paper towels to absorb remainder of fat.
  4. Pour bacon fat into a medium-size skillet over medium heat, sweat shallots, about 2-3 minutes.
  5. Add brown sugar and apple cider vinegar, mix together.
  6. Add tomatoes and reduce for 10-15 minutes until mixture becomes thick.  Add the African Bird Pepper.
  7. Add bacon to pan, stir in salt to taste.
  8. Texture should be spreadable not runny.
  9. Cool then store in airtight container in fridge. (We like WECK jars)

The jam should keep under refrigeration for up to a week.  We like to warm before serving.

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Stilton-Pear Crostini

ModernDrinks-67Recipes by: Rj of Urban Table

Photo Styling & Art Direction by: Traci of Urban Table

Photography & Art Direction by: Heather of Heather Gill Photography

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These little bites are really fantastic.  We are sure you will love these as much as we do.  The brioche is much softer then a baguette even when toasted so it won’t take away from the cheese and grilled pear.  Yes, we said grilled pear.

Stilton-Pear Crostini

Loaf of brioche

1/3 cup walnut oil

6 oz Stilton Cheese

3 Anjou pears (grilled)

1/2 cup fresh rosemary walnuts (recipe below)

honey for drizzling

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees and set the grill to high.
  2. Brush pear slices with walnut oil and grill until softened.  Make a turn half way through so you can get the nice cross hatch grill marks.
  3. Slice brioche into 1/2 inch think slices.
  4. Brush with remaining walnut oil and bake until golden brown.
  5. While still warm top with cheese then pear. (We did 2 layers of this.)  Then sprinkle with rosemary walnuts and drizzle with honey.

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Rosemary Walnuts

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

2 springs fresh chopped rosemary

olive oil (for frying)

salt to taste

  1. In a skillet set on medium high heat, heat the oil.
  2. Fry walnuts until they float and remove from oil.
  3. Sprinkle with salt and chopped rosemary.

You might want to make more of these because they are lovely on their own or on salads to add a bit of crunch.

Well, we are almost done for the week!  What do you think is up for Friday?  Let us know in the comments or on our Facebook page.

Modern Day Forager

Olive Tapenade

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Recipes by: Rj of Urban Table

Photo Styling & Art Direction by: Traci of Urban Table

Photography & Art Direction by: Heather of Heather Gill Photography

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This is a lovely addition to any party.  Just thin slice a baguette and toast or grill after brushing with olive oil and serve.

Olive Tapenade

1 cup kalamata olives, pitted

1 cup large green olives, pitted

1 cup black olives, pitted

1 red bell pepper, roasted, seeded and chopped

4-5 cloves of garlic

1/2 oz parsley, chopped

1/2 oz basil, chopped

3 teaspoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons capers

5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Lemon Zest (as garnish)

Italian Flat Leaf Parsley (as garnish)

  1. Put the olives (all 3), capers, garlic and bell pepper into a food processor.
  2. Pulse in 1-second intervals about 8-10 times.
  3. Add the herbs, lemon juice and olive oil.
  4. Pulse another 8-10 times.  Be careful not to over process.
  5. Garnish with lemon zest and parsley.

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Modern Day Foragers